In God We Trvst

2013-10-06
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The front of a Peace Dollar (minted from 1921-1928 and then again from 1934-1935) has the words "In God We Trvst" printed on it.

Above the Main Alter of Saint Paul's Church, 151 North 9th Street, Reading, is an inscription "TE DEVM LAVDAMVS."

There is a Latin Hymn "Te Deum," an abbreviated title commonly given both to the original Latin text and the translations of a hymn in rhythmical prose, of which the opening words, "Te Deum Laudamus," formed its earliest known title (written before A.D. 502). The title is taken from its opening Latin words, Te Deum Laudamus, rendered literally as "Thee, O God, we praise."

Are "Trvst" or "TE DEVM LAVDAMVS" misspellings?

The Romans used both <V> and <U>, depending on the writing style. In the Middle Ages both shapes started to appear side by side in the same writing style, but for a long time they were still just positional variants of a single letter.

Top: Peace Dollar.
Bottom: Main Alter, St. Paul's Catholic Church,
151 North 9th Street, Reading, PA

The practice of using <V, v> for the consonant and <U, u> for the vowel is very recent (not fully established until sometime around the 18th century).

Some people like to use all caps or small caps for writing Latin, and usually they take it a step further and use only <V>, never <U>. Some people use all lowercase and only <u>, never <v>.

 


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